Library
Gabbertoons
Collection Total:
1,225 Items
Last Updated:
May 6, 2014
Gourmet's Cook Book of Fish and Game - Volume 1
Louis P. Degouy1947 ASSUME 1ST EDITION GREEN CLOTH, GILT LETTERING HARDCVR,
The Shameless Carnivore: A Manifesto for Meat Lovers
Scott GoldThe average American consumes 218.3 pounds of meat every year. But in the face of concerns about Mad Cow disease, dubious industrial feedlot practices, and self-righteous vegetarians, the carnivorous lifestyle has become somewhat déclassé. Now, Scott Gold issues a red-blooded call to arms for the meat-adoring masses to rise up, speak out, and reclaim their pride. 

The Shameless Carnivore explores the complexities surrounding the choice to eat meat, as well as its myriad pleasures. Delving into everything from ethical issues to dietary, anthropological and medical findings, Gold answers such probing questions as: Can staying carnivorous be more healthful than going vegetarian? What’s behind the “tastes like chicken” phenomenon?  And, of course, what qualities should you look for in a butcher? The author also chronicles his attempt to become the ultimate carnivore by eating thirty-one different meats as well as every part, cut and organ of a cow (including tasty recipes), describes hunting squirrels in Louisiana, and even spends an entire, painstaking week as a vegetarian.

From the critter dinners he relished as a child to his adult forays into exotic game and adventures in the kitchen, Gold writes with an infectious enthusiasm that might just inspire readers to serve a little llama or rattlesnake at their next dinner party. This is the definitive book for meat lovers.
Barbecue Crossroads: Notes and Recipes from a Southern Odyssey
Robb WalshIn stories, recipes, and photographs, James Beard Award-winning writer Robb Walsh and acclaimed documentary photographer O. Rufus Lovett take us on a barbecue odyssey from East Texas to the Carolinas and back. In Barbecue Crossroads, we meet the pitmasters who still use old-fashioned wood-fired pits, and we sample some of their succulent pork shoulders, whole hogs, savory beef, sausage, mutton, and even some barbecued baloney. Recipes for these and the side dishes, sauces, and desserts that come with them are painstakingly recorded and tested. But Barbecue Crossroads is more than a cookbook; it is a trip back to the roots of our oldest artisan food tradition and a look at how Southern culture is changing. Walsh and Lovett trace the lineage of Southern barbecue backwards through time as they travel across a part of the country where slow-cooked meat has long been part of everyday life. What they find is not one story, but many. They visit legendary joints that don't live up to their reputations - and discover unknown places that deserve more attention. They tell us why the corporatizing of agriculture is making it difficult for pitmasters to afford hickory wood or find whole hogs that fit on a pit. Walsh and Lovett also remind us of myriad ways that race weaves in and out of the barbecue story, from African American cooking techniques and recipes to the tastes of migrant farmworkers who ate their barbecue in meat markets, gas stations, and convenience stores because they weren't welcome in restaurants. The authors also expose the ways that barbecue competitions and TV shows are undermining traditional barbecue culture. And they predict that the revival of the community barbecue tradition may well be its salvation.
Goat: Meat, Milk, Cheese
Bruce Weinstein, Mark ScarbroughFrom appearances at the most high-end restaurants to street food carts coast-to-coast, goat meat and dairy products are being embraced across the country as the next big thing. With its excellent flavor, wide-ranging versatility, and numerous health benefits, goat meat, milk, and cheese are being sought by home cooks. And while goat is the world’s primary meat (upwards of 70 percent of the red meat eaten around the world is goat) never before has there been a cookbook on this topic in the United States. Goat is a no-holds-barred goatapedia, laugh-out-loud cooking class, cheesemaking workshop, and dairy-milking expedition all in one. With recipes such as Pan-Roasted Chops with Blackberries and Sage, Meatballs with Artichokes and Fennel, and Chocolate-Dipped Goat Cheese Balls, this book is sure to become the resource for this new frontier.  

Praise for Goat:

 

“If in five years we’re all eating goat burgers and goat chili, it’ll be because of this book.”

—Bon Appétit

“A rare guide to all things goat . . . Even if you skip the meat chapters, there’s enough in this book to keep you cooking — and entertained.”
- Dallas Morning News

"Boasting fewer calories and less fat than chicken, beef, lamb, or pork, there is certainly a health case to be made for goat meat, say Scarbrough and Weinstein, but it is the environmental impact that may be the most compelling from a societal point of view." 
-Treehugger.com
Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human
Richard WranghamEver since Darwin and The Descent of Man, the existence of humans has been attributed to our intelligence and adaptability. But in Catching Fire, renowned primatologist Richard Wrangham presents a startling alternative: our evolutionary success is the result of cooking. In a groundbreaking theory of our origins, Wrangham shows that the shift from raw to cooked foods was the key factor in human evolution. When our ancestors adapted to using fire, humanity began. Once our hominid ancestors began cooking their food, the human digestive tract shrank and the brain grew. Time once spent chewing tough raw food could be sued instead to hunt and to tend camp. Cooking became the basis for pair bonding and marriage, created the household, and even led to a sexual division of labor. Tracing the contemporary implications of our ancestors’ diets, Catching Fire sheds new light on how we came to be the social, intelligent, and sexual species we are today. A pathbreaking new theory of human evolution, Catching Fire will provoke controversy and fascinate anyone interested in our ancient origins—or in our modern eating habits.