Library
Gabbertoons
Collection Total:
1,225 Items
Last Updated:
May 6, 2014
The Devil's Cup: A History of the World According to Coffee
Stewart Lee AllenIn this captivating book, Stewart Lee Allen treks three-quarters of the way around the world on a caffeinated quest to answer these profound questions: Did the advent of coffee give birth to an enlightened western civilization? Is coffee, indeed, the substance that drives history? From the cliffhanging villages of Southern Yemen, where coffee beans were first cultivated eight hundred years ago, to a cavernous coffeehouse in Calcutta, the drinking spot for two of India’s three Nobel Prize winners . . . from Parisian salons and cafés where the French Revolution was born, to the roadside diners and chain restaurants of the good ol’ U.S.A., where something resembling brown water passes for coffee, Allen wittily proves that the world was wired long before the Internet. And those who deny the power of coffee (namely tea-drinkers) do so at their own peril.
The Social History of Bourbon: An Unhurried Account of Our Star-Spangled American Drink
Gerald Carson
Happiness is a dry martini by Johnny Carson
Johnny CarsonClassic Johnny Carson book. Adult humor book, very funny. Illustrated by Whitney Darrow Jr.
Angels' Visits: An Inquiry into the Mystery of Zinfandel
David DarlingtonZinfandel—California's "mystery grape," so called because of the obscurity of its origins—has pursued a picaresque career, coming to epitomize the course and character of California wine. Here Darlington delves into the myriad legends surrounding Zinfandel and interweaves them with his own wine-making experience.
Under the Table: A Dorothy Parker Cocktail Guide
Kevin C. FitzpatrickFew writers have earned Dorothy Parker’s reputation for drinking as much or as hard, and fewer still have achieved her notorious skill at wisecracking wit. Kevin C. Fitzpatrick, president of the Dorothy Parker Society, gives us an intoxicating new look at the doyenne of the ripping riposte through the lens she most preferred: the bottom of a glass. A bar book for Parker enthusiasts and literary tipplers alike, Under the Table offers a unique take on Parker, the infamous Algonquin Round Table, and the Jazz Age by profiling and celebrating the drinks that she, her bitter friends, and sweetest enemies enjoyed and discussed. Each entry of this delicious compendium offers a fascinating and lively background of a period cocktail, its ingredients, and the characters associated with it. The book also features a special selection of twenty-first century speakeasy-style recipes from top mixologists from across the country. A complete recipe with detailed instructions forms the centerpiece of each entry, and topping it off are illuminating excerpts from Parker’s poems, stories, and other writings that will allow you to enjoy her world from the speakeasies of New York City to the watering holes of Hollywood.
Saké Pure + Simple: Facts, Tips, Lore, Libation
Griffith Frost, John GauntnerGrif Frost's SakéOne brewery has revolutionized how Americans drink saké-not hot but lightly chilled. Here he and saké expert John Gauntner provide useful and fun facts about brewing, history, tasting, connoisseurship, selection, and etiquette. This updated edition includes new saké bars and shops, plus a new introduction by Andrew Weil, M.D., on saké as a natural, pure beverage.

Griffith Frost is CEO of SakéOne in Forest Grove, Oregon. John Gauntner has written several books on saké.
The Sommelier Prep Course: An Introduction to the Wines, Beers, and Spirits of the World
M. GibsonA comprehensive, must-have guide to beverage service including wine, beer, and spirits

The Sommelier Prep Course is the ultimate resource for any aspiring sommelier, bartender, or serious wine lover. It includes sections on viniculture and viticulture, Old World and New World wines, beer and other fermented beverages, and all varieties of spirits. Review questions, key terms, a pronunciation guide, maps, and even sample wine labels provide invaluable test prep information for acing the major sommelier certification exams.

For each type of beverage, author Michael Gibson covers the essential history, manufacturing information, varieties available, and tasting and pairing information. He also includes sections on service, storage, and wine list preparation for a full understanding of every aspect of beverage service.
•    An ideal test prep resource for anyone studying for certification by The Court of Master Sommeliers, The Society of Wine Educators, or The International Sommelier Guild
•    An excellent introduction to wine and beverages for bartenders, beverage enthusiasts, and students
•    Based on education materials developed by the author for his culinary and hospitality students at the Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts in Scottsdale

With concise, accessible information from an expert sommelier, this is the most complete guide available to all the wines, beers, and spirits of the world.
The Wine Trials 2011
Robin Goldstein, Alexis Herschkowitsch, Tyce WaltersThis is the third edition of the book that challenged the wine establishment and revealed the widely available wines under $15 that beat out wines costing up to 10 times their price in blind tastings. The Wine Trials 2011 features full-page reviews of 175 all-new wines for 2010, based on completely new blind tastings of the latest vintages, with a special focus on up-and-coming value wine regions like Portugal and Greece. Each review includes a cheeky, unpretentious discussion of each wine’s flavors and aromas, and a photo of the bottle for easy identification.
The World Atlas of Wine
Hugh Johnson, Jancis RobinsonThere are few books that have had such a monumental impact in their field as The World Atlas of Wine; sales of the first four editions exceed 3.5 million copies. Now, world-renowned authors Hugh Johnson and Jancis Robinson have teamed up to combine their unrivalled talents. Together they have created the fifth edition of this masterpiece, making it the most thorough and expansive revision ever of the work. In keeping with the Atlas's reputation for cartographic excellence, all 148 maps from the fourth edition have been completely revised and modernised, with an additional 30 new maps. Hailed by Decanter as Wine Book of the Millennium, The World Atlas of Wine has been described by critics worldwide as 'extraordinary' and 'irreplaceable'. In this, its fifth edition in 30 years, it remains an essential addition to every wine-lovers or professional's library.
Lapham's Quarterly - Intoxication - Vol. 1, #1 - Winter 2013
Lewis H. Lapham
Alcoholica Esoterica: A Collection of Useful and Useless Information As It Relates to the History andConsumption of All Manner of Booze
Ian LendlerFinally, there’s a book that’s almost as much fun as having a couple of drinks. Alcoholica Esoterica presents the history and culture of booze as told by a writer with a knack for distilling all the boring bits into the most interesting facts and hilarious tales. It’s almost like pulling up a stool next to the smartest and funniest guy in the bar. Divided into chapters covering the basic booze groups—including beer, wine, Champagne, whiskey, rum, gin, vodka, and tequila—Alcoholica Esoterica charts the origin and rise of each alcohol’s particular charms and influence. Other sections chronicle “Great Moments in Hic-story,” “Great Country Drinking Songs,” “10 Odd Laws,” and “Mt. Lushmore, Parts I–V.” Additionally, famous quotes on the joys and sorrows of liquor offer useful shots of advice and intoxicating whimsy.

Did you know... that the word bar is short for barrier? Yes, that’s right—to keep the customers from getting at all the booze. that Winston Churchill’s mother supposedly invented the Manhattan? that the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock because the sailors on the Mayflower were running low on beer and were tired of sharing? that you have a higher chance of being killed by a flying Champagne cork than by a poisonous spider? that the Code of Hammurabi mandated that brewers of low-quality beer be drowned in it? that beer was so popular with medieval priests and monks that in the thirteenth century they stopped baptizing babies with holy water and started using beer?
Uncorked: The Science of Champagne
Gerard Liger-BelairUncorked is the first book to quench our curiosity about the inner workings of one of the world's most popular drinks. Prized for its freshness, vitality, and sensuality, champagne is a wine of great complexity. Mysteries aplenty gush forth with the popping of that cork. Just what is that fizz? Can you judge champagne quality by how big the bubbles are, by how long they last, by how they behave before they fade? Why exactly does serving champagne in a long-stemmed flute prolong both the chill and the effervescence?

Through lively prose and a wealth of state-of-the-art, high-speed photos, this book unlocks the door to the mystery of what champagne effervescence is really all about. Gérard Liger-Belair provides an unprecedented close-up view of the beauty in the bubbles—images that look surprisingly like lovely flowers, geometric patterns, even galaxies as they rise through the glass and then burst forth on the surface. He fully illustrates: how bubbles form not on the glass itself but are instead "born" out of debris stuck on the glass wall; how they rise; and how they burst—the most picturesque and functional stage of the bubble's fleeting life.

Uncorked also provides a colorful history of champagne, tells us how it is made, and asks: could global warming spell its demise? Bubbly may tickle the nose, but this book tackles what the nose and the naked eye cannot—the spectacular science of that which gives champagne its charm and gives us our pleasure.
Poisons: From Hemlock to Botox to the Killer Bean of Calabar
Peter MacinnisIn the tradition of Salt and Stiff, a wide-ranging and provocative look-teeming with little-known facts and engaging stories-at a subject of the direst interest. Poisons permeate our world. They are in the environment, the workplace, the home. They are in food, our favorite whiskey, medicine, well water. They have been used to cure disease as well as to incapacitate and kill. They smooth wrinkles, block pain, stimulate, and enhance athletic ability. In this entertaining and fact-filled book, science writer Peter Macinnis considers poisons in all their aspects. He recounts stories of the celebrated poisoners in history and literature, from Nero to Thomas Wainewright, and from the death of Socrates to Hamlet and Peter Pan. He discusses the sources of various poisons-from cyanide to strychnine, from Botox to ricin and Sarin gas-as well as their detection. Then he analyzes the science of their action in the body and their uses in medicine, cosmetics, war, and terrorism. With wit and precision, he weighs such questions as: Was Lincoln's volatility caused by mercury poisoning? Was Jack the Ripper an arsenic eater? Can wallpaper kill? For anyone who has ever wondered and been afraid to ask, here is a rich miscellany for your secret questions about toxins.
The Wine Bible
Karen MacNeilTHE MOST COMPLETE WINE BOOK EVER. A must for anyone who loves wine, whether they are a pro or an amateur. Thorough, authoritative, and entertaining. (Robert Mondavi, founder and chairman emeritus of the Robert Mondavi Family of Wines)

"The most informative and entertaining book I've ever seen on the subject." (Danny Meyer, co-author of The Union Square Cafe Cookbook)

The essentials: The romance and intrigue of Burgundy of sauvignon blanc and the surprising elegance of Spain's top Riojas. Italy, one of wine's most enchanting and ancient homelands. What makes a great wine great? The reason behind Champagne's bubbles. The precise and food-friendly wines of Germany. California, wine's Camelot. The lip-smackingly good wines of Australia. The complexities of Port revealed. How a vineyard profoundly affects a wine's character.

Plus, matching wine with food - and mood. The secrets of professional wine tasters and how to expand your wine-tasting vocabulary. And everything else you need to know to buy, store, serve, and enjoy the world's most captivating beverage.

The shimmering elegance of Veuve Clicquot, affordable luxury in a glass, page 185.

Ravishing, elegant, and rich, Petrus in Ingrid Bergman in red satin, page 156.

Some wines are like people... they get better as they get older, pg. 64.

Sherry, the world's most misunderstood and underappreciated wine, page 437.
Tea in the East: Tea Habits Along the Tea Route
Carole ManchesterThere is no more refined ritual than that of tea drinking in Asia. In "Tea in the East," Carole Manchester, author of "French Tea," invites you on a journey to the earliest tea-producing countries — China, Japan, India, Sri Lanka — to savor the pleasures of the ancient brew.

Lavishly illustrated with beautiful full-color photographs of tea ceremonies and their exotic settings, "Tea in the East" evokes the tranquillity and unique pleasures of the Eastern tea. In China, aged tea leaves are steeped for seconds in a tiny clay pot and poured into doll-sized handleless cups, the earthy taste savored as if it were a rare wine. In a still, silent room in Kyoto, powdered green tea is reverently whisked in a ceramic bowl in preparation for the tea ceremony. On the lawn of a planters' club in India, tea is served in cups covered with tiny beaded doilies to keep the tea free from dust.

Eastern tea ceremonies embody a rare grace in both their gentle choreography and in the decorative and functional beauty of the tea service. In China, the fashion of drinking tea inspired the craftsmanship of exquisite porcelain and ceramic teaware. In Japan, artisans create starkly simple teabowls, whisks, lacquer trays, and boxes. The teas of India are served in teacups made of silver.

As delicate and elegant as the utensils of the Eastern tea ceremony itself are their sweet and savory accompaniments. Dim sum, tiny stuffed delicacies, are served with a Cantonese tea; a bitter Japanese tea is balanced by seasonal bean curd sweets; Indians serve hot and spicy pastries with milky, sugary tea; and Sri Lankans drink their tea with crepe-like pastries called hoppers. Together with the story of tea in theEast, you'll find recipes for tempting and unusual tea accompaniments, including a savory Green Tea-Marinated Chicken Sandwich, Marbled Tea Eggs, and the Russian Tea Room Spice Cake.

The varieties of Asian teas are as distinctive as their traditions. Using "Tea in the East" as a guide, you can explore the many satisfying tastes and aromas: the flowery Pai Mu Tan, a rare mix of two white tea plants from China; Japan's finest green tea, Gyokuro; Genmaicha, which is mixed with roasted rice that gives it a popcorn flavor; Darjeelings and robust Assam teas of India: and the exquisite afternoon teas of Ceylon. Also included are recipes for iced teas and tea remedies, as well as suggestions for the many practical uses of tea, storage methods, and a buyer's source guide.
The PDT Cocktail Book: The Complete Bartender's Guide from the Celebrated Speakeasy
Jim Meehan, Chris GallBeautifully illustrated, beautifully designed, and beautifully crafted—just like its namesake—this is the ultimate bar book by NYC's most meticulous bartender.   To say that PDT is a unique bar is an understatement. It recalls the era of hidden Prohibition speakeasies: to gain access, you walk into a raucous hot dog stand, step into a phone booth, and get permission to enter the serene cocktail lounge. Now, Jim Meehan, PDT's innovative operator and mixmaster, is revolutionizing bar books, too, offering all 304 cocktail recipes available at PDT plus behind-the-scenes secrets. From his bar design, tools, and equipment to his techniques, food, and spirits, it's all here, stunningly illustrated by Chris Gall.
Bordeaux: Revised Third Edition
Robert M. ParkerWhen Robert M. Parker, Jr.'s "Bordeaux" was first published in 1985, it was greeted with tremendous enthusiasm by such legendary authorities as Hugh Johnson and Michael Broadbent. "Time, Newsweek, Business Week, Esquire, " and "People" magazines soon joined in the praise, and the book became a huge commercial and critical success. In England, it won the prestigious Glenfiddich award.
Since that time, Parker has published eight other books for wine lovers, many of which have received critical awards — "Burgundy, The Wines of the Rhô ne Valley and Provence, " four editions of the "Wine Buyer's Guide, The Wines of the Rhô ne Valley, " and an updated edition of "Bordeaux" in 1991 — as well as his highly respected newsletter, "The Wine Advocate, " and bi-monthly columns in "Food & Wine" magazine. With each book, his audience has expanded to the point where not only American wine consumers but also those in France, England, Japan, Sweden, and Germany have quickly learned to trust his palate. In 1995, Parker became the first American in the wine field to receive La Croix du Chevalier de l'Ordre Nationale du Mé rite (The Cross of the Knight of the National Order of Merit), one of France's two highest honors, conferred on him directly by President Franç ois Mitterrand. In 1998, he won the James Beard Award for Outstanding Wine and Spirits Professional. Clearly, it can be said that Robert Parker is America's foremost wine professional.
With this third edition of the classic that launched him, Parker strives to maintain his unprecedented independence, objectivity, clarity, and enthusiasm in reporting on the vintages of Bordeaux and provides the prodigiouscomprehensiveness for which he is known. Not only has he added tastings for the vintages in the intervening years between this and the last edition but he has also retasted and reevaluated many earlier vintages. His accessible and direct style welcomes both the seasoned wine collector and the eager beginner to the pleasures of fine wine and France's most illustrious châ teaux.
Organized by appellation, "Bordeaux" moves alphabetically from one producer to the next, providing essential information and an overview of the property and its owners, listing each vintage, and including numerical ratings and detailed tasting notes of most of that chateau's wines for the past thirty-seven years. At the end of each tasting note, Parker estimates the "anticipated maturity" — the range of time when the wine should peak in flavor and balance — and each entry concludes with a summary of the chateau's older vintages. Throughout these extensive commentaries and tasting notes, there is never a doubt that this is the most complete consumer's guide to the wines of Bordeaux ever written.
Who is making Bordeaux's best and worst wines? What has a specific châ teau's track record been over the last thirty or forty years? What châ teaux are overrated and overpriced? Which are underrated or underpriced? Always with an eye toward the consumer, Parker distinguishes true value from perceived value.
While the bulk of the book is given over to these ratings, the opening and closing chapters of the book provide readers with a true sense of the changes in the region and its vintages. Such critical issues as: Who most influences winemaking styles?, What role does technology play in modernwine production?, and What impact do second labels have on the quality of the first? are tackled here. Parker also lovingly describes the growing conditions in the region year by year, spending considerable time discussing the 1995 vintage, which he terms "the most consistently top-notch vintage since 1990." In addition to this, Parker reassesses the Bordeaux Classifications, the effects of the soil on the grapes, and the different winemaking processes. He then rounds out this incredible volume with a User's Guide to Bordeaux Wines, practical travel and dining information for wine-touring trips, a complete glossary of terminology, and a quick reference index of the entire book.
As the first book to discuss the 1995, 1996, and 1997 vintages in detail — vintages that are being hailed as the Best of the Century — the third edition of "Bordeaux" is the best tool to use in making both purchasing and consuming decisions. From the wine writer "The Sunday Times" (London) calls "the world's most experienced and trustworthy palate, " "Bordeaux" provides all the information today's consumer needs in order to select the perfect bottle.
Uncommon Grounds: The History Of Coffee And How It Transformed Our World
Mark PendergrastUncommon Grounds tells the story of coffee from its discovery on a hill in Abyssinia to its role in intrigue in the American colonies to its rise as a national consumer product in the twentieth century and its rediscovery with the advent of Starbucks at the end of the century. A panoramic epic, Uncommon Grounds uses coffee production, trade, and consumption as a window through which to view broad historical themes: the clash and blending of cultures, the rise of marketing and the “national brand,” assembly line mass production, and urbanization. Coffeehouses have provided places to plan revolutions, write poetry, do business, and meet friends. The coffee industry has dominated and molded the economy, politics, and social structure of entire countries.Mark Pendergrast introduces the reader to an eccentric cast of characters, all of them with a passion for the golden bean. Uncommon Grounds is nothing less than a coffee-flavored history of the world.
The Naked Pint: An Unadulterated Guide to Craft Beer
Christina Perozzi, Hallie BeauneFrom Stouts, Barleywines, and Lambics to food pairing, tasting, and homebrewing—this is beer as you’ve never known it before.

The Naked Pint is a definitive primer on craft brews that celebrates beer for what it truly is: sophisticated, complex, and flavorful. Covering everything from beer history to the science behind beer, food and beer pairings, tasting, and homebrewing, Perozzi and Beaune strip down America’s favorite beverage to its truest form. Whether you’ve just started wondering what life is like beyond the ice-cold six-pack or have already discovered your favorite Porter or IPA, The Naked Pint will help you unearth the power that comes with knowing your ales from your lagers.
For All the Tea in China: How England Stole the World's Favorite Drink and Changed History
Sarah RoseA dramatic historical narrative of the man who stole the secret of tea from China

In 1848, the British East India Company, having lost its monopoly on the tea trade, engaged Robert Fortune, a Scottish gardener, botanist, and plant hunter, to make a clandestine trip into the interior of China—territory forbidden to foreigners—to steal the closely guarded secrets of tea horticulture and manufacturing. For All the Tea in China is the remarkable account of Fortune's journeys into China—a thrilling narrative that combines history, geography, botany, natural science, and old-fashioned adventure.

Disguised in Mandarin robes, Fortune ventured deep into the country, confronting pirates, hostile climate, and his own untrustworthy men as he made his way to the epicenter of tea production, the remote Wu Yi Shan hills. One of the most daring acts of corporate espionage in history, Fortune's pursuit of China's ancient secret makes for a classic nineteenth-century adventure tale, one in which the fate of empires hinges on the feats of one extraordinary man.
Homemade Soda: 200 Recipes for Making & Using Fruit Sodas & Fizzy Juices, Sparkling Waters, Root Beers & Cola Brews, Herbal & Healing Waters, ... & Floats, & Other Carbonated Concoctions
Andrew SchlossMaking your own soda is easy and inexpensive. Best of all, you control the sweetness level and ingredients, so you can create a drink that’s exactly what you want. Using a few simple techniques, anyone can make a spectacular variety of beverages. Try Pomegranate Punch, Chai Fizz, Fruity Root Beer, Sparkling Orange Creamsicle, Honey Cardamom Fizzy Water, Sparkling Espresso Jolt, Cold Fudge Soda, Lightly Salty Caramel Seltzer, Sangria Shrub, Maraschino Ginger Ale, Malted Molasses Switchel, or Berry Vinegar Cordial. Some recipes show you how to re-create the flavors of favorite commercial soft drinks, and others show you how to use homemade soda in decadent desserts and adult cocktails. The delicious possibilities are endless!
The Sommelier's Guide to Wine
Brian H. SmithThis updated and revised edition is the essential guide for aspiring wine connoisseurs who are seeking the knowledge and confidence of a C.I.A. wine professional.

Written by a leading wine educator from the esteemed Culinary Institute of America, The Sommelier's Guide to Wine is an engaging, in-depth introduction to the often-intimidating world of wine.

This fully updated guide provides a basic text for wine aficionados. Created in a handy size and format, it gives wine lovers the confidence and savvy to navigate the wine list in a restaurant or the aisles of the local wine store. Foodies, wine expert wannabes, wait staff, and wine lovers alike can learn how to present, serve, drink, and store wine just like a sommelier. The guidebook explains different wine styles, grape types, wine regions, and includes tips on how to properly pair wines with specific foods. Learn about all the new wine trends, too.

Full of photos, maps, and illustrations, The Sommelier's Guide to Wine takes readers from winemaking methods through reading labels, buying, ordering, and presenting all varieties of wine. It's the perfect introduction to the complex world of wines.
A History Of The World In Six Glasses
Tom StandageFrom beer to Coca-Cola, the six drinks that have helped shape human history.Throughout human history. certain drinks have done much more than just quench thirst. As Tom Standage relates with authority and charm, six of them have had a surprisingly pervasive influence on the course of history, becoming the defining drink during a pivotal historical period.

A History of the World in 6 Glasses tells the story of humanity from the Stone Age to the 21st century through the lens of beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and cola. Beer was first made in the Fertile Crescent and by 3000 B.C.E. was so important to Mesopotamia and Egypt that it was used to pay wages. In ancient Greece wine became the main export of her vast seaborne trade, helping spread Greek culture abroad. Spirits such as brandy and rum fueled the Age of Exploration, fortifying seamen on long voyages and oiling the pernicious slave trade. Although coffee originated in the Arab world, it stoked revolutionary thought in Europe during the Age of Reason, when coffeehouses became centers of intellectual exchange. And hundreds of years after the Chinese began drinking tea, it became especially popular in Britain, with far-reaching effects on British foreign policy. Finally, though carbonated drinks were invented in 18th-century Europe they became a 20th-century phenomenon, and Coca-Cola in particular is the leading symbol of globalization.

For Tom Standage, each drink is a kind of technology, a catalyst for advancing culture by which he demonstrates the intricate interplay of different civilizations. You may never look at your favorite drink the same way again.
The Drunken Botanist: The Plants That Create the World's Great Drinks
Amy StewartA New York Times Bestseller
Sake began with a grain of rice. Scotch emerged from barley, tequila from agave, rum from sugarcane, bourbon from corn. Thirsty yet?  In The Drunken Botanist, Amy Stewart explores the dizzying array of herbs, flowers, trees, fruits, and fungi that humans have, through ingenuity, inspiration, and sheer desperation, contrived to transform into alcohol over the centuries.

Of all the extraordinary and obscure plants that have been fermented and distilled, a few are dangerous, some are downright bizarre, and one is as ancient as dinosaurs—but each represents a unique cultural contribution to our global drinking traditions and our history.

This fascinating concoction of biology, chemistry, history, etymology, and mixology—with more than fifty drink recipes and growing tips for gardeners—will make you the most popular guest at any cocktail party.

(from the catalog)
Wicked Plants: The Weed That Killed Lincoln's Mother and Other Botanical Atrocities
Amy StewartA tree that sheds poison daggers; a glistening red seed that stops the heart; a shrub that causes paralysis; a vine that strangles; and a leaf that triggered a war. In Wicked Plants, Stewart takes on over two hundred of Mother Nature’s most appalling creations. It’s an A to Z of plants that kill, maim, intoxicate, and otherwise offend. You’ll learn which plants to avoid (like exploding shrubs), which plants make themselves exceedingly unwelcome (like the vine that ate the South), and which ones have been killing for centuries (like the weed that killed Abraham Lincoln's mother).

Menacing botanical illustrations and splendidly ghastly drawings create a fascinating portrait of the evildoers that may be lurking in your own backyard. Drawing on history, medicine, science, and legend, this compendium of bloodcurdling botany will entertain, alarm, and enlighten even the most intrepid gardeners and nature lovers.
Stalking the Green Fairy: And Other Fantastic Adventures in Food and Drink
James VillasThe Food Writer of the Year (Bon Appetit, 2003) Takes You on His Quest for the Ultimate Culinary Experiences . . .

"[This book reveals] . . . the positively Sherlockian discipline and brilliance of Mr. Villas on the scent of any culinary mystery he feels possessed to unravel."
—From the Foreword by Jeremiah Tower

Praise for James Villas:

"One of America's greatest journalists."
—Emeril Lagasse

"There are not many writers around who are as much fun to read as James Villas. In his intensely personal style, he is elegant, quirky, opinionated, precise, and lyrical."
—Paula Wolfert

"James Villas is a man of stature. He travels widely, he has a keen eye, and a keener palate, he knows the arts and times, and has many interests, which makes him all the sharper when he writes about food."
—James Beard
The World of Caffeine: The Science and Culture of the World's Most Popular Drug
Bennett Alan Weinberg, Bonnie K. BealerHow much do we really know about our number one drug of choice? This book, the first natural, cultural, and artistic history of our favourite mood enhancer tells us more, by looking at how caffeine was discovered, its early uses, and the unexpected parts it has played in medicine, religion, painting, poetry, learning and love. "The World of Caffeine" is a tale of art and society containing many fascinating stories including: how Balzac's addiction to caffeine drove him to eat coffee and may have killed him; how a mini Ice Age may have helped bring coffee, tea and chocolate to popularity in Europe; and how caffeine, in its various forms, was used as cash in China, Africa, Central America and Egypt.
Tea at the Blue Lantern Inn: A Social History of the Tea Room Craze in America
Jan WhitakerThe Gypsy Tea Kettle. Polly's Cheerio Tea Room. The Mad Hatter. The Blue Lantern Inn. These are just a few of the many tea rooms - most owned and operated by women — that popped up across America at the turn of the last century, and exploded into a full-blown craze by the 1920s. Colorful, cozy, festive, and inviting, these new-fangled eateries offered women a way to celebrate their independence and creativity. Sparked by the Suffragist movement, Prohibition, and the rise of the automobile, tea rooms forever changed the way America eats out, and laid the groundwork for the modern small restaurant and coffee bar.

In this lively, well-researched book, Jan Whitaker brings us back to the exciting days when countless American women dreamed of opening their own tea room - and many did. From the Bohemian streets of New York's Greenwich Village to the high-society tea rooms of Chicago's poshest hotels, from the Colonial roadside tea houses of New England to the welcoming bungalows of California, the book traces the social, artistic, and culinary changes the tea room helped bring about.

Anyone interested in women's history, the early days of the automobile, the Bohemian lives of artists in Greenwich Village, and the history of food and drink will revel in this spirited, stylish, and intimate slice of America's past.
Know Your Coffee
Stevie Wilson, Vita AyalaAn insightful window into the culture of coffee and the science involved in making the perfect cup. A fully illustrated guide book to coffee drinks, answering questions about: what is a macchiato really?
Imbibe!: From Absinthe Cocktail to Whiskey Smash, a Salute in Stories and Drinks to "Professor" Jerry Thomas, Pioneer of the American Bar Featuringthe ... and a Selection of New Drinks Contributed in
David WondrichA lively, historically informed, and definitive guide to classic American cocktails.

Cocktail writer and historian David Wondrich presents the colorful, little-known history of classic American drinks-and the ultimate mixologist's guide-in this engaging homage to Jerry Thomas, father of the American bar.

Wondrich reveals never-before-published details and stories about this larger- than-life nineteenth-century figure, along with definitive recipes for 100 punches, cocktails, sours, fizzes, toddies, slings, and other essential drinks, plus twenty new recipes from today's top mixologists, created exclusively for this book.

This colorful and good-humored volume is a mustread for anyone who appreciates the timeless appeal of a well-made drink-and the uniquely American history behind it.
Windows on the World Complete Wine Course: 2008 Edition
Kevin ZralyWindows on the World Complete Wine Course is simply the bestselling wine book in North America—it’s a classic. The 2007 edition alone has sold over 100,000 copies and reorders continue to pour in. Along with the expanded text that has made last year’s update so successful, the 2008 revision will include a special 16-page supplement on “How to Taste Wine,” taken directly from Kevin’s world-famous class. This new material will include more than 100 wines that Zraly selects for his students to taste, along with the tasting sheet they use for their evaluations. Organized by region, from simple to complex, his list begins with white wines from France, the U.S., and Germany; moves on to the red wines of Burgundy and the Rhône, Bordeaux, the U.S., Italy, Australia, Argentina, and Chile; and concludes with champagnes and ports. By following Kevin’s order, readers will experience the best wines and the wide diversity of taste, style, region, and country. It’s not only a comprehensive and bargain-priced hands-on wine education, but a superb catalog from which to start a wine cellar or find a bottle appropriate to any occasion. In addition, the label for each of the 101 wines is shown, along with commentary on how to read it, suggestions for alternative wines, and specific instructions on how to set up a tasting using Kevin’s techniques. This is the first time Kevin’s actual list has ever been offered in book form and it alone is worth the cover price of Windows on the World Complete Wine Course.
Of course, as always, this unequaled volume retains all the invaluable information, fabulous illustrations, and gorgeous styling of the previous editions—all presented in Zraly’s inimitable, irreverent style. This is the wine guide against which all others are judged.