Library
Gabbertoons
Collection Total:
1,225 Items
Last Updated:
May 6, 2014
Will Eisner: A Spirited Life
Bob AndelmanThis beautifully illustrated biography explores the fascinating life of Will Eisner, detailing a career that exceeds six decades in which Eisner spearheaded the cause of comics for adult readers and created the first widely accepted graphic novel, A Contract with God. Eisner's influence has been felt by such diverse talents as Batman creator Bob Kane and Jack Kirby. Underground comics legend R. Crumb and Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonists Jules Feiffer and Art Spiegelman have hailed Eisner's cinematic approach to comics and his enduring character The Spirit. From his childhood to educating Army soldiers to famously turning down a proposal for Superman, Eisner's personal and professional life is told in dramatic detail. Bob Andelman spent almost three years interviewing Eisner, researching his life and work and interviewing his friends, family, and the creative talents he inspired over a seventy-year career. Among those who spoke about their personal experience with Will Eisner were: Alan Moore, Dave Gibbons, Neil Gaiman, Denis Kitchen, Joe Kubert, Stan Lee, Jules Feiffer, Neal Adams, and Patrick McDonnell.
Leonardo: Discovering the Life of Leonardo Da Vinci
Serge Bramly1991 hardcover with dust jacket as shown. Partial first blank page possibly publisher error - Otherwise book in Fine condition. Jacket has light top edgewear.
Shakespeare: The World as Stage
Bill BrysonWilliam Shakespeare, the most celebrated poet in the English language, left behind nearly a million words of text, but his biography has long been a thicket of wild supposition arranged around scant facts. With a steady hand and his trademark wit, Bill Bryson sorts through this colorful muddle to reveal the man himself. His Shakespeare is like no one else's—the beneficiary of Bryson's genial nature, his engaging skepticism, and a gift for storytelling unrivaled in our time.
Alexander Hamilton
Ron ChernowIn the first full-length biography of Alexander Hamilton in decades, National Book Award winner Ron Chernow tells the riveting story of a man who overcame all odds to shape, inspire, and scandalize the newborn America. According to historian Joseph Ellis, Alexander Hamilton is “a robust full-length portrait, in my view the best ever written, of the most brilliant, charismatic and dangerous founder of them all.”

Few figures in American history have been more hotly debated or more grossly misunderstood than Alexander Hamilton. Chernow’s biography gives Hamilton his due and sets the record straight, deftly illustrating that the political and economic greatness of today’s America is the result of Hamilton’s countless sacrifices to champion ideas that were often wildly disputed during his time. “To repudiate his legacy,” Chernow writes, “is, in many ways, to repudiate the modern world.” Chernow here recounts Hamilton’s turbulent life: an illegitimate, largely self-taught orphan from the Caribbean, he came out of nowhere to take America by storm, rising to become George Washington’s aide-de-camp in the Continental Army, coauthoring The Federalist Papers, founding the Bank of New York, leading the Federalist Party, and becoming the first Treasury Secretary of the United States.

Historians have long told the story of America’s birth as the triumph of Jefferson’s democratic ideals over the aristocratic intentions of Hamilton. Chernow presents an entirely different man, whose legendary ambitions were motivated not merely by self-interest but by passionate patriotism and a stubborn will to build the foundations of American prosperity and power. His is a Hamilton far more human than we’ve encountered before—from his shame about his birth to his fiery aspirations, from his intimate relationships with childhood friends to his titanic feuds with Jefferson, Madison, Adams, Monroe, and Burr, and from his highly public affair with Maria Reynolds to his loving marriage to his loyal wife Eliza. And never before has there been a more vivid account of Hamilton’s famous and mysterious death in a duel with Aaron Burr in July of 1804.

Chernow’s biography is not just a portrait of Hamilton, but the story of America’s birth seen through its most central figure. At a critical time to look back to our roots, Alexander Hamilton will remind readers of the purpose of our institutions and our heritage as Americans.
Oscar Wilde
Richard EllmannThe biography sensitive to the tragic pattern of the story of a great subject: Oscar Wilde - psychologically and sexually complicated, enormously quotable, central to a alluring cultural world and someone whose life assumed an unbearably dramatic shape.
The Salad Days
Douglas Fairbanks Jr.This is an autobiography of the crown prince of American cinema, son of the disputed king of the silver screen, Douglas Fairbanks Sr. The relationship of father and son looms large in the book for the book ends in 1940 shortly after Fairbank Senior's death.
Fonda: My Life
Henry Fonda, Howard TeichmannFonda: My Life
Cromwell: The Lord Protector
Antonia FraserIn Cromwell, award-winning biographer Antonia Fraser tells of one of England's most celebrated and controversial figures, often misunderstood and demonized as a puritanical zealot. Oliver Cromwell rose from humble beginnings to spearhead the rebellion against King Charles I, who was beheaded in 1649, and led his soldiers into the last battle against the Royalists and King Charles II at Worcester, ending the civil war in 1651. Fraser shows how England's prestige and prosperity grew under Cromwell, reversing the decline it had suffered since Queen Elizabeth I's death.
Robertson Davies: Man of Myth
Judith Skelton GrantDrawing on interviews with the Canadian novelist himself and an unprecedented access to his notebooks and family papers, a detailed biography traces the evolution of Davies's work and the relationship between his life and his fiction.
Alexander Hamilton: A Biography in His Own Words
Alexander Hamilton
Benjamin Franklin: An American Life
Walter IsaacsonBenjamin Franklin is the Founding Father who winks at us. An ambitious urban entrepreneur who rose up the social ladder, from leather-aproned shopkeeper to dining with kings, he seems made of flesh rather than of marble. In bestselling author Walter Isaacson's vivid and witty full-scale biography, we discover why Franklin seems to turn to us from history's stage with eyes that twinkle from behind his new-fangled spectacles. By bringing Franklin to life, Isaacson shows how he helped to define both his own time and ours.
He was, during his 84-year life, America's best scientist, inventor, diplomat, writer, and business strategist, and he was also one of its most practical — though not most profound — political thinkers. He proved by flying a kite that lightning was electricity, and he invented a rod to tame it. He sought practical ways to make stoves less smoky and commonwealths less corrupt. He organized neighborhood constabularies and international alliances, local lending libraries and national legislatures. He combined two types of lenses to create bifocals and two concepts of representation to foster the nation's federal compromise. He was the only man who shaped all the founding documents of America: the Albany Plan of Union, the Declaration of Independence, the treaty of alliance with France, the peace treaty with England, and the Constitution. And he helped invent America's unique style of homespun humor, democratic values, and philosophical pragmatism.
But the most interesting thing that Franklin invented, and continually reinvented, was himself. America's first great publicist, he was, in his life and in his writings, consciously trying to create a new American archetype. In the process, he carefully crafted his own persona, portrayed it in public, and polished it for posterity.
Through it all, he trusted the hearts and minds of his fellow "leather-aprons" more than he did those of any inbred elite. He saw middle-class values as a source of social strength, not as something to be derided. His guiding principle was a "dislike of everything that tended to debase the spirit of the common people." Few of his fellow founders felt this comfort with democracy so fully, and none so intuitively.
In this colorful and intimate narrative, Isaacson provides the full sweep of Franklin's amazing life, from his days as a runaway printer to his triumphs as a statesman, scientist, and Founding Father. He chronicles Franklin's tumultuous relationship with his illegitimate son and grandson, his practical marriage, and his flirtations with the ladies of Paris. He also shows how Franklin helped to create the American character and why he has a particular resonance in the twenty-first century.
Birdseye: The Adventures of a Curious Man
Mark KurlanskyBreak out the TV dinners! From the author who gave us Cod, Salt, and other informative bestsellers, the first biography of Clarence Birdseye, the eccentric genius inventor whose fast-freezing process revolutionized the food industry and American agriculture.
David Rockefeller: Memoirs
David RockefellerDavid Rockefeller was born in 1915, the youngest child of John D. Rockefeller, Jr., one of the richest men in the United States, and the great patron of modern art Abby Aldrich Rockefeller. He graduated from Harvard College in the depths of the Depression, when the capitalist order, which his grandfather had helped to create, was under relentless attack. He studied at the London School of Economics and the University of Chicago, where he earned a Ph.D.

He worked briefly for New York City’s flamboyant mayor Fiorello La Guardia before enlisting in the U.S. Army in 1942. His service as an intelligence officer in North Africa and France brought him into contact with many of the individuals who would soon dominate European politics and gave him a unique perspective on the events and personalities that eventuated in the “twilight struggle” of the Cold War.

Rockefeller joined the Chase bank in 1946 as an assistant manager in the Foreign Department and rose through the ranks to become chairman of the board and chief executive officer. During that time, he struggled constantly to modernize and internationalize the bank’s operations, often against a conservative and risk-averse corporate culture.

During his eighty-seven years, David Rockefeller has:

• come to know world leaders ranging from Zhou Enlai to Mikhail Gorbachev, Anwar Sadat to Ariel Sharon, General Augusto Pinochet to Saddam Hussein
•worked with every U.S. president since Dwight Eisenhower, at times serving as an unofficial emissary on high-level missions
•traveled to more than one hundred countries, logging approximately five million miles while circling the globe dozens of times

Throughout his life David Rockefeller has been passionately interested in the welfare of the world around him, particularly in the city of New York. His involvement with Rockefeller Center, the Museum of Modern Art, the Rockefeller University, the redevelopment of the Wall Street area and the building of the World Trade Center, and many other projects is revealed in these memoirs.

It’s almost inconceivable that one man’s life could encompass so many things. But David Rockefeller’s life has, and he tells the world all about it in this candid and highly informative book. This is the first time a Rockefeller has ever told his own story.

As a financier, a philanthropist, and the ultimate ambassador without portfolio, David Rockefeller, scion of one of history’s most fabled families, has experienced a life that is unique in every aspect. This, in his own words, is the story of that remarkable life.
Moondog, The Viking of 6th Avenue: The Authorized Biography
Robert Scotto"Moondog is one of America’s great originals."—Alan Rich, New York Magazine

Here is one of the most improbable lives of the twentieth century: a blind and homeless man who became the most famous eccentric in New York and who, with enormous diligence, rose to prominence as an internationally respected music presence.

Born Louis Thomas Hardin in 1916, Moondog first made an impression in the late 1940s when he became a mascot of The New York Philharmonic at Carnegie Hall. His unique, melodic compositions were released on the Prestige jazz label. In the late 1960s the Viking-garbed Moondog was a pop music sensation on Columbia Records. Moondog is the noted inspiration for the contemporary freak folk movement led by Devendra Banhart.

Moondog's compositional style influenced his former roommate, Philip Glass, whose Preface and performances of Moondog works appear in the book. Moondog's work transcends labels and redefines the distinction between popular and high culture. A CD compilation with a variety of Moondog's compositions is bound into the book.

The CD tracklisting is as follows: 1: Caribea (1:32) Performer/Composer: Moondog 2: To a Sea Horse (1:43) Performer/Composer: Moondog 3: Trees Against the Sky (.51) Performer/Composer: Moondog 4: Oo Debut (1:09) Performer/Composer: Moondog 5: Autumn (2:07) Performer/Composer: Moondog 6: Moondog Monologue (8:24) Performer/Composer: Moondog 7: Moondog’s Theme (1:53) Performer/Composer: Moondog 8: Trimbas in Quarters (1:47) Performer/Composer: Moondog 9: I Came Into This World Alone (1:19) Performers: Moondog, Steve Reich, Philip Glass, Jon Gibson Composer: Moondog 10: Be a Hobo (1:22) Performers: Moondog, Steve Reich, Philip Glass, Jon Gibson Composer: Moondog 11: Why Spend the Dark Night With You (1:40) Performers: Moondog, Steve Reich, Philip Glass, Jon Gibson Composer: Moondog 12: All is Loneliness (1:38) Performers: Moondog, Steve Reich, Philip Glass, Jon Gibson Composer: Moondog 13: Organ Rounds (2:04) Performer/Composer: Moondog 14: Canon in F Major, Book I (.43) Performer: Paul Jordan Composer: Moondog 15: Canon in B Flat Major, Book III (1:36) Performer: Paul Jordan Composer: Moondog 16: Canon in B Flat Major, Book I (.43) Performer: Paul Jordan Composer: Moondog 17: Canon in B Flat Major, Book II (.28) Performer: Paul Jordan Composer: Moondog 18: Canon in G Sharp Minor, Book I (.44) Performer: Paul Jordan Composer: Moondog 19: Canon in C Sharp Minor, Book II (1:32) Performer: Paul Jordan Composer: Moondog 20: 5/4 Snakebite Rattle (3:41) Performer: Stefan Lakatos Composer: Moondog 21: Trimbas and Woodblock in 5/2 (1:26) Performer: Stefan Lakatos Composer: Moondog 22: When I Am Deep in Sleep (2:17) Performer: Stefan Lakatos Composer: Moondog 23: Rabbit Hop (2:25) Performer/Composer: Moondog 24: Dog Trot (2:25) Performer/Composer: Moondog 25: Bird’s Lament (2:00) Performer/Composer: Moondog 26: Viking 1 (2:55) Performer/Composer: Moondog 27: Heimdall Fanfare (3:06) Performer/Composer: Moondog 28: Intro and Overtone Continuum (2:22) Performer/Composer: Moondog
Glenn Miller and His Orchestra
George T. SimonMoonlight Serenade, Sunrise Serenade, Little Brown Jug, In the Mood... These and other memorable tunes endeared Glenn Miller to millions in the Swing Era and all who recall those times. After playing trombone and arranging for leading orchestras of the Dorsey brothers, Ray Noble, Ben Pollack, and Red Nichols, Glenn Miller formed his own "sweet" band, which from 1938 to 1942 achieved widespread popularity second only to Benny Goodman's. Miller learned all he could from these and other bands like Jimmie Lunceford's and Artie Shaw's, going on to create a uniquely rich sound with clarinet over four saxes and four trombones ("three-part harmony sounds too thin," he once exclaimed). Simon tells of both the successes and hard times of Miller's illustrious career, up to his celebrated Army Air Force band and his untimely death.
Humans of New York
Brandon StantonBased on the blog with more than a million loyal fans, a beautiful, heartfelt, funny, and inspiring collection of photographs and stories capturing the spirit of a city

 

In the summer of 2010, photographer Brandon Stanton set out on an ambitious project: to single-handedly create a photographic census of New York City.  Armed with his camera, he began crisscrossing the city, covering thousands of miles on foot, all in an attempt to capture New Yorkers and their stories.  The result of these efforts was a vibrant blog he called "Humans of New York," in which his photos were featured alongside quotes and anecdotes. 

 

The blog has steadily grown, now boasting more than a million devoted followers.  Humans of New York is the book inspired by the blog.  With four hundred color photos, including exclusive portraits and all-new stories, Humans of New York is a stunning collection of images that showcases the outsized personalities of New York.

 

Surprising and moving, printed in a beautiful full-color, hardbound edition, Humans of New York is a celebration of individuality and a tribute to the spirit of the city.
 

With 400 full-color photos and a distinctive vellum jacket
The Strange Case of Edward Gorey
Alexander TherouxThe Firecracker Alternative Book Award-winning look back at the life of the late artist Edward Gorey. Combining artistic analysis, a personal reminiscence of the artist Theroux knew for over 25 years, and an intimate familiarity with Gorey's oeuvre while drawing on exclusive interviews with the artist (the book was begun before Gorey's passing in 2000 at the age of 75 but completed just after), this book stands as the most comprehensive bio yet written about the beloved but reclusive and enigmatic artist.
A Curious Man: The Strange and Brilliant Life of Robert "Believe It or Not!" Ripley
Neal Thompson*An Amazon Best Book of the Month
*A Barnes & Noble Booksellers' Pick
*An NPR pick for 2013
*A Vanity Fair Hot Type pick
*A Publishers Lunch Buzz Book 2013
*An iTunes/iBookstore Best Book of the Month
*A Parade magazine 2013 Summer Read

A Curious Man is the marvelously compelling biography of Robert “Believe It or Not” Ripley, the enigmatic cartoonist turned globetrotting millionaire who won international fame by celebrating the world's strangest oddities, and whose outrageous showmanship taught us to believe in the unbelievable.

As portrayed by acclaimed biographer Neal Thompson, Ripley’s life is the stuff of a classic American fairy tale. Buck-toothed and cursed by shyness, Ripley turned his sense of being an outsider into an appreciation for the strangeness of the world. After selling his first cartoon to Time magazine at age eighteen, more cartooning triumphs followed, but it was his “Believe It or Not” conceit and the wildly popular radio shows it birthed that would make him one of the most successful entertainment figures of his time and spur him to search the globe’s farthest corners for bizarre facts, exotic human curiosities, and shocking phenomena.

Ripley delighted in making outrageous declarations that somehow always turned out to be true—such as that Charles Lindbergh was only the sixty-seventh man to fly across the Atlantic or that “The Star Spangled Banner” was not the national anthem. Assisted by an exotic harem of female admirers and by ex-banker Norbert Pearlroth, a devoted researcher who spoke eleven languages, Ripley simultaneously embodied the spirit of Peter Pan, the fearlessness of Marco Polo and the marketing savvy of P. T. Barnum.

In a very real sense, Ripley sought to remake the world’s aesthetic. He demanded respect for those who were labeled “eccentrics” or “freaks”—whether it be E. L. Blystone, who wrote 1,615 alphabet letters on a grain of rice, or the man who could swallow his own nose.

By the 1930s Ripley possessed a vast fortune, a private yacht, and a twenty-eight room mansion stocked with such “oddities” as shrunken heads and medieval torture devices, and his pioneering firsts in print, radio, and television were tapping into something deep in the American consciousness—a taste for the titillating and exotic, and a fascination with the fastest, biggest, dumbest and most weird. Today, that legacy continues and can be seen in reality TV, YouTube, America’s Funniest Home Videos, Jackass, MythBusters and a host of other pop-culture phenomena.

In the end Robert L. Ripley changed everything. The supreme irony of his life, which was dedicated to exalting the strange and unusual, is that he may have been the most amazing oddity of all.